Kim Klausen Returns from First Season of Fieldwork

Thursday, June 23, 2016

From left to right: Chris Henry of the USGS, Ph.D. student Kim Klausen and her Supervisor, Professor Brian Cousens  Chris Henry is based in Reno. He knows the local geology extremely well and was able to accompany us on our field work.

From left to right: Chris Henry of the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Ph.D. student Kim Klausen and her Supervisor, Professor Brian Cousens. Chris Henry is based in Reno. He knows the local geology extremely well and was able to accompany us on our field work.

 

Kim Klausen is finishing up the first year of her Ph.D. program with Supervisor Professor Brian Cousens. She just completed the first season of fieldwork toward her Ph.D. project in the remote Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest of Nevada. She returned on Wednesday with a total of 56 samples, many of which are welded tuff. 

Her Ph.D. project is focused on the geochemical and geochronological characteristics of the Underdown Caldera, which is located in the Shoshone Mountains, Nevada. It’s an interesting topic of study because very little is known about the area. She will aim to determine how the caldera formed by evaluating the number of eruptive cycles through detailed petrographic, geochemical and geochronological analyses.

“Right now, my goal is to process my samples for whole rock and trace element geochemistry. Once this data comes in, I’ll carefully select samples for isotope work”, says Kim.

This is a change of pace for Kim, who did a Master's thesis in experimental geology at the University of New Brunswick. 

 

More pictures of her fieldwork are available here


Underdown Caldera in the Shoshone Mountains of Nevada erupted and resulted in columnar jointing, a cooling feature of the lava

Underdown Tuff in the Shoshone Mountains of Nevada erupted within the caldera and resulted in columnar jointing, a cooling feature of the lava